Wednesday, 23 August 2017

Review: Dr First originated by Roger Hargreaves

I enjoyed reading Dr Fourth so much that I just had to go back and read another title in this great mash up series that places the Doctor in his various regenerations inside the Mr Men universe. In Doctor First, a very grumpy doctor travels to his most hated planet--earth--along with his granddaughter Susan. Arriving there in the 1960s (of course!) calamity abounds as Susan disappears and the doctor goes in search of her, find a number of foes along the way, from hippies to pop music and, finally, the most irritating enemy of all, Cybermen.

This one was an enjoyable read that doesn't take itself too seriously. I loved the Doctors method for defeating the Cybermen, and I found that the Mr Men incarnations of both the First Doctor and Susan to be quite apt. (I love the inclusion of Susan's hat.) The 1960s setting is quite appropriate and leads to a bit of humour.

Highly recommended! 

Sunday, 20 August 2017

Literary Quotes



But with the morning cool repentance came.


Saturday, 19 August 2017

Review: Marge and the Great Train Rescue by Isla Fisher

Marge the zany babysitter with rainbow hair and a penchant for fun is back in three new stories that are just the right length for reading out loud. On the menu this time around is a lost tooth, a train ride and a trip to the zoo. But as Jemima Button and her little brother Jake know, when Marge is with them, their adventures will be anything but ordinary. How will Jake recover his lost tooth and ensure that it gets delivered to the tooth fairy? Later the three come to the rescue when the train gets stuck (much to the ire of an uptight conductor,) and some well, unexpected hilarity ensures when the trio visit the zoo.

Marge and the Great Train Rescue was an enjoyable instalment in a now well-established series, one that thrives on fun and imagination. All three stories were light and funny, making them perfect for kids to read on their own. There's also enough to keep adult readers entertained when reading the stories out loud. Eglantine Ceulemans' illustrations add to the light and fun feel of this novel. I understand that this is to be the final book in the series--which makes me wonder if Isla Fisher will be putting her pen down, or if she will continue to write in addition to acting? Time will tell, I guess.

Lots of fun, especially for kids. Recommended. 

Friday, 18 August 2017

Friday Funnies: Garfield Comic


Just wanted to share this Garfield comic, one that hails from the early days of the strip when Garfield was larger and, arguably, behaved more like a cat and less like a human ... 



Thursday, 17 August 2017

Review: Everyday Ethics by Dr Simon Longstaff

How do we live an ethical life in an ever-changing world? In Everyday Ethics Dr Simon Longstaff offers readers a practical guide on how to life a more ethical life. The book covers many, many topics, from Global Warming to Marriage to Making Ethical Purchases to Gender and the Workplace. Gently, Dr Longstaff presents each issue, along with a number of questions for the reader to ponder. 

I found this to be an interesting read--certainly a starting point on understanding the difference between doing what is good and what is right. (And yes, you guessed it, often the two can be a long way from each other.) And obviously, it's a sound reminder on how the decisions that each of us make can help to shape the world--so lets make them good ones.

The author is the Executive Director of the Ethics Centre.

Recommended.

Thank you to Ventura Press for my review copy of Everyday Ethics.

This book was read as part of the Aussie Author Challenge 2017

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Around Adelaide (Best of Kathryn's Instagram)




I spotted this big nose recently while I was walking through the Central Markets. It's a fun, quirky piece of art ... but I really want to be standing nearby if it should suddenly sneeze!

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Review: PS I Like You by Kasie West

PS I Like You is a sweet YA read about first loves and discovering that, sometimes, there is more to others than we may realise. Lily is the second kid in a loving, working class family that has a bit of an artistic vibe--her father is a freelance furniture designer, her mother creates jewellery and sells it at markets. Lily herself has an interest in music, plays the guitar and is keen to enter a songwriting contest that is happening in her area. She's not popular at school--especially with the spoiled, BMW driving Cade Jennings--so it is a bit of a surprise when someone discovers that she's been scribbling song lyrics on a desk in her Chemistry class, and starts leaving her notes. Soon, Lily and the unnamed person are exchanging notes back and forth ... but bigger problems ensue when Lily discovers that the author of the notes is none other than Cade.

This was a light and entertaining story that I read in the space of an evening. It's sweet, cute and a little cliched, but the journey is a fun one. Lily's family were a lot of fun to read about, and the poor rich kid trope made for an entertaining contrast. There is really not much else I can say about this one, apart from the fact that it has some truly funny moments (poor Bugs Rabbit,) and anyone who goes into it not expecting Shakespeare will probably have a great time.

A little young and immature at times, but the fun more than makes up for it. Recommended.